Tainan Prison ,Agency of Corrections , Ministry of Justice
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    The Prison was established in 1894 at Sinsheng Street in Tainan City. It was called “Tainan Penalty Institute”, and was renamed “Taiwan Third Prison” after the restoration of Taiwan in 1945. It was so shabby that it could not function properly until ...details


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 Inmates in the Tainan Prison Today

2018.5.22

Gender 

Total 

Inmate 

Total

3,250

3,250

 Male

3,250

3,250

 Female

0

0










hot news
On December 28, 2017, the UN Security Council designated Billions No.18 to be banned from port entry pursuant to resolutions 2371, 2375, and 2397. In accordance with Counter-Terrorism Financing Act, which came into effect on July 27, 2016, the Ministry of Justice held a designation review committee meeting today and decided to impose targeted financial sanctions on Chen, Shih-Hsien, the Bunker’s Taiwan Group Corporation (registered in British Virgin Islands), and the Billions Bunker Group Corporation (registered in Marshall Islands). The review committee is chaired by the MOJ and consists of deputy ministers of the National Security Bureau, the Ministry of Interior, the Ministry of Economic Affairs, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of National Defense, the Central Bank, and the Financial Supervisory Commission. Located in the Asia-Pacific region, Taiwan shares the responsibility to protect regional security. The MOJ calls on the public, especially all the financial institutions and DNFBPs, not to make any type of transactions, neither to provide any property or financial benefits to the individuals and entities on the designated list. Such an act would constitute a TF offense.
The three-day international review of the Republic of China’s second set of national reports regarding its implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights concluded January 18 at the Chang Yung-fa Foundation in Taipei. The two review panels, comprised of 10 international experts, presented 78 concluding observations and recommendations at a press conference held by the Presidential Office Human Rights Consultative Committee January 20. The event held at the Ministry of Justice was presided over by Minister without Portfolio Lin Mei-chu, who accepted the observations and recommendations on behalf of the ROC government. Over the course of the three days, the panelists reviewed the ROC’s implementation of each article of the two covenants, and held extensive and in-depth discussions with ROC government officials and representatives of domestic and foreign human rights groups. Important human rights issues covered included rights protection for such disadvantaged groups as indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities, women, children, new immigrants, and migrant workers; establishment of a national human rights institution; equality and non-discrimination; capital punishment; labor rights; resistance against eviction; and land justice. The review panels prepared a report on their concluding observations and recommendations after hearing briefings by the government and nongovernmental organizations. The report included five parts—introduction, general issues, specific issues relating to the ICESCR, specific issues relating to the ICCPR, and follow-up. The introduction elaborated on the ROC’s implementation of the two covenants, publication of the first and second set of national reports, organization of the international review, procedure by which concluding observations were reached, and the expectation that the ROC government under the leadership of President Tsai Ing-wen could take a proactive approach toward the full implementation of international human rights law. In the next three parts, observations were made on general issues as well as the ROC’s protection of the rights accorded under the two covenants. Recommendations were made for policy, legislation, and enforcement. After reviewing the national reports, parallel reports, responses to questions, and parallel responses from the government and civil society groups, as well as constructive dialogue with their representatives, the review panels suggested that the ROC government give priority to adopting concrete measures on human rights issues. General issues included the establishment of a national human rights institution, education and training, corporate social responsibility, transitional justice, and protection of the rights of indigenous peoples and persons with disabilities. Recommendations for ICESCR implementation covered issues that have attracted widespread attention in Taiwan, such as foreign fishermen on Taiwanese fishing vessels, disputed land acquisition and urban renewal cases involving eviction, sex education, and education on gender equality. For ICCPR implementation, recommendations were made regarding capital punishment, right to personal liberty, the right to marriage and family life, and revision of the Assembly and Parade Act—all of which are controversial issues or major concerns in Taiwan. In final part of the report, the panelists confirmed that the ROC should continue employing this review mechanism and suggested that a national action plan for human rights be formulated to ensure that their concluding observations and recommendations are implemented. Minister without Portfolio Lin thanked the 10 experts for traveling to Taiwan to participate in this year’s review. She pledged that the ROC government would uphold human rights as a pillar of the nation’s foundation, and urge for its agencies to incorporate into their policies the spirit of the two Covenants and other international human rights accords that have been incorporated into domestic law. She stated that the Executive Yuan would oversee efforts by its ministries and related agencies to carry out the concluding observations and recommendations. With the conclusion of the international review of the second national reports on human rights, the ROC’s protection of human rights has reached a new height. The successful establishment of the review mechanism for the reports was facilitated by the longstanding support and assistance of the internationally renowned experts for ROC endeavors as well as joint participation and constructive dialogue among government agencies and NGOs. The Ministry of Justice will continue to follow this review mechanism, which will serve as a platform for communication between the public and private sectors as well as a bridge between the ROC and the international human rights system, such that the protections listed in the two covenants are put into practice nationwide.
An international review of the Republic of China’s second set of reports regarding its implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights is being conducted January 16 to 18 at the Chang Yung-fa Foundation in Taipei. Ten internationally renowned experts who have participated in UN human rights protection efforts for many years have been invited to join the review panel. Panelists will engage in extensive and in-depth discussions with ROC government officials and representatives of domestic and foreign human rights groups on important human rights issues in Taiwan. At the opening ceremony, ROC Vice President Chen Chien-jen stated that the ROC has published two sets of reports on compliance with the two covenants since they were implemented in Taiwan in 2009, noting that the second international review begins today. He observed that the ROC government has made immense progress and achieved considerable success in its advancement and protection of human rights since the first set of reports were issued four years ago. He hoped that the current mode of review will enable the international community to better understand the ROC’s efforts and accomplishments and that the government will build its administration on realizing democracy, the rule of law, and protection of human rights. Vice President Chen also stated that although the ROC is unable to participate in the UN human rights mechanism, it has incorporated the covenants in its domestic law. Of the nine core UN international human rights instruments, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination was signed and ratified by the ROC prior to its loss of representation in the UN, and put into effect in 1971. Implementation acts have been introduced for five other human rights instruments in recent years, namely, the ICCPR, the ICESCR, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Three other conventions remain to be incorporated into domestic law—the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment; the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families; and the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance. The competent authorities are proactively preparing the domestic legalization of these conventions. Our goal is for the entire citizenry to enjoy democracy, the rule of law, and human rights, and for the ROC to become a benchmark for human rights in Asia. One human rights expert who is unable to attend this review in person has been closely following the development of human rights in the ROC and has made many valuable suggestions. Another expert, Professor Nisuke Ando, who participated in the review of the ROC’s first set of reports, submitted a list of questions for the review panel before he passed away in December 2016. Minister of Justice Chiu Tai-san, head of the ROC government delegation, paid tribute to Professor Ando and expressed gratitude for his contribution to the ROC’s implementation of the covenants. The two covenants and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights are the most important UN documents on human rights. Their implementation is pertinent to every individual. Topics under review include labor rights, land justice, rights and interests of indigenous peoples, right to an adequate standard of living, fair trials, and freedom of speech. The review sessions are being broadcast live on a dedicated website (with simultaneous interpretation, including sign language). Those interested in the ROC’s human rights are welcome to visit the website: http://www.2017twccprcescr.tw/second_meeting2.html.
An international review of the Republic of China’s second set of reports regarding its implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights will be conducted January 16 to 20 in Taiwan. The International Bill of Human Rights consists of the two covenants plus the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It defines the basic and most important standards and legal obligations for the protection of human rights worldwide. Ten internationally renowned experts have been invited to take part in the review. They will examine the ROC response to the concluding observations and recommendations from the first review in 2013, and appraise its progress in human rights protection since that time. The review will also be attended by human rights experts from United Nations organizations, prominent international groups, national committees of other countries, and foreign media, highlighting Taiwan’s determination to uphold human rights in line with global trends. The ROC implemented the two covenants December 10, 2009, to ensure its governance is based on respect for human rights, declare its resolve to protect these rights, and raise its standards in tandem with the rest of the world. At the same time, it established a mechanism for the release of national human rights reports in compliance with the covenants. The first national reports were published in April 2012. As the ROC is without UN representation, it is unable to submit its reports for review as is the general practice for UN members. A panel of 10 international experts was thus invited to conduct a review in Taiwan February 25 to 27, 2013. They presented 81 observations and recommendations March 1, recognizing the efforts and commitment that the government and people of the ROC had made to comply with global standards, and offering concrete suggestions for improvements in its human rights protection. As per its draft and review mechanism for national reports on compliance with the covenants, the ROC has continued to scrutinize its own endeavors in accordance with international norms. In drafting the second reports last year, 115 meetings were held, including discussions between representatives of the Presidential Office Human Rights Consultative Committee, nongovernmental organizations, and the majority of government agencies. The second reports were published April 25, 2016: the Common Core Document Forming Part of the Reports; Response to the Concluding Observations and Recommendations Adopted by the International Group of Independent Experts on March 1, 2013; Implementation of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; and Implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. This year the review sessions will be broadcast live online to increase public awareness and participation in human rights issues while giving interested individuals an opportunity to better understand the review process. This arrangement will ensure that human rights are no longer an issue to be discussed behind closed doors by international scholars and experts, but rather an important topic that is closely associated with every member of society. By holding the international review, the ROC is demonstrating its commitment and effort to implement the two covenants, as well as its proactive participation in international human rights affairs.
25 Taiwanese suspects involving telecommunication fraud with people of the Mainland China were deported to Mainland China by the Cambodian police on June 24th. The Ministry of Justice (the “MOJ”) would like to respond to the situation as follows: The Ministry of Public Security of Mainland China (the “MOPS”) and the Cambodian police jointly tracked down the equipment of telecommunication fraud in Phnom Penh, Cambodian and 39 Chinese and Taiwanese suspects were arrested since June 13th. The MOJ was notified of the situation by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Criminal Investigation Bureau earlier before and was informed at noon by the MOPS that 25 Taiwanese suspects would be deported to Wenzhou of Chekiang Province in Mainland China from Cambodia today. After being notified that the first group of Taiwanese suspects was arrested in Cambodia on June 13th, the MOJ immediately contacted Mainland China for more details and required Mainland China authority must not take the suspects back and that Taiwan and Mainland China should launch joint investigation based on long-term trust and cooperation. According to the information from the MOPS, 25 out of this group of suspects were Taiwanese. The victims of the fraud were all Chinese, and Mainland China has sent a team to Cambodia earlier to investigate the case together with Cambodian authority. Because Mainland China signed an extradition treaty with Cambodia and was eager to make the deportation happen, the MOJ’s attempt to bring the people back failed. The MOJ regrets that Cambodia deported Taiwanese suspects to Mainland China under Mainland China’s request without consultation with the MOJ first. However, determined to crack down on cross-border telecommunication fraud, the MOJ will maintain conversation with Mainland China on the basis of Cross Strait Joint Fight against Crime and Mutual Legal Assistance Agreement to continue looking after the people and launch joint cooperation for combating crimes with Mainland China in no time.
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